Second set of grass studies

The two with blurred water areas have been put in the trash and one missed the photo shoot, but I am enjoying the flow of ink and using a flat brush combined with a bamboo brush. The movement and repetition of brushstrokes builds my momentum and keeps me thinking of new compositions. The two in the trash just had too much water and just got overworked. I’m mostly thinking about the marsh grasses with their thick hearty blades in the glistening sun.

Spider Grass

Spider Grass or Liriope, the scientific name is a great grass to use as a border along sidewalks or create edging around a tree.

Most of the spider grass in our yard is helpful, but there was a long section in front that got out of line. You know when a child cuts their own hair? Kinda looked like that.

So we located the spider grass and a few times I saw these beautiful caterpillars in the spider grass clusters.

The curvy caterpillar in it’s fancy fur inspired the painting along with the spider frass, but the painting took on an extension of fancy when I saw the inch long eyelashes of one of our Kindergarten teachers. She wears them daily. Back to the spider grass in well kept yards around Savannah, I thought about the fancy women going out or coming home from the piano bar in their glitz and glam hopefully walking along a well lit entrance. The pale pink is inspired by that shade of blush pink for lips or cheeks even perhaps those satin gloves or jeweled clutch.

As I explore grass in the content of my work, I look forward to grass as the tool to investigate people and place. My process continues to collect imagery from my mind and put together a puzzle in some way.

Melinda Borysevicz

The summer of June 2018 I attended the teacher workshop week. The week included a tour of Alexander Hall and I saw this painting. Meeting Melinda tonight and hearing her speak about her work was incredible! She shared her first painting of a pile of shoes that she found in her parents garage and then a painting by Robert Motherwell that struck her heart as ”I want to do that too.”

Melinda’s work includes abstraction and she shared that while she is focusing on realism with a tinge of abstraction, she feels compelled for others to know that she believes in all art forms. The recent gallery where she is showing work in Barcelona gave her the impression that the gallery/community mostly supports realistic work. In that same line of sharing she also pointed out to ’seize opportunity without being an ass’ to speak up if a juried show is mostly men or selection of artists is mostly men in that women make a tremendous contribution to the arts. Learning that she was ready to be a painter as her main profession and become comfortable with instability was admirable. She’s not moving to NYC anytime soon, but painting makes her happy, so she is happy.

Elegy to the Spanish Republic, Robert Motherwell

November 4th

Process Research included these studies in my goal to improve palette, composition and scale. You will find my SCAD MOA activities here . Alexander Hall activies here

Palette My palette for painting and scale has been inspired by color field painters such as Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Motherwell and Richard Diebenkorn. In painting backdrops for my school plays, I learned to love the physicality of painting large scale. Kerry James Marshall, Marcus Dunn, Wayne Thiebaud all have palettes that I love, but also appreciate content you can find withing the allegories and symbolism of these paintings.

Composition & Scale About mid way of painting the first set of 25 paintings, I was starting to feel trapped inside the 9×12 and 8×8 wood panels so I started loosening up with painting grass.

Upscaling with large grass was fantastic and I finally felt like the path for my work was mine to take. To become more familiar with local grass and composition I took lots of photos in the Spartina Grass with perriwinkle snails. This research gave me several ideas for small grasswork studies in composition.

SCAD MOA & Alexander Hall

Frederick Douglass & inspiring Marcus Dunn Review

My first impression of the SCAD experience outside of our painting class was the night we attended the Frederick Douglass Symposium to meet, hear and learn from Isaac Julien. My first impression was pure awe. We can gather in this thoughtful theatre space to be sitting among talented peers in a discussion with Isaac Julien, an accomplished artist. The entry way to the theatre is the exhibition of Marcus Dunn, who’s work is so beautiful that I could barely focus on entering the theatre and then layering on the discussion we just had in the theatre.

I needed to do a bit of research on Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) after the discussion, because my mind was also thinking about Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) after recently seeing show with wonder of how close were their lives and did they overlap. The imagery Isaac Julien assembled for in the exhibit was interesting to me in the the calmness it gave. Using nature by itself, walking in nature and quiet moments riding through nature while Douglass was working on the tremendous tasks of the abolition. These images spoke to the elements of who Douglass was (intelligent, humble, brave, persistent) in order to carry out the actions of his being (orator, abolitionist, suffragist, leader, writer, reformer and statesman. Trees are intellegent, nature is humble with a quiet voice, brave to endure change with each season and persistent in its resilience as we tread, fight over and develop the land that continues to be part of human growth and tension. My favorite image is of the boots and overcoat of Douglass walking through the field that gives you a sense of the value in taking time to think before you speack or act. We need more of that in our culture today.

Marcus Dunn’s palette, abiltity to create sunfilled scenery and cast light on his figures is impressive. You can just tell by how the supportive tones of gray bring a richness and depth to his work. I was looking at his facebook and website and found this great example I will keep in my mind to consider with process. I love the sketchy, washy colors as beginning layers. Like printers print from light to dark, I like seeing the darks applied before the lights. Marcus Dunn’s palette, abiltity to create sunfilled scenery and cast light on his figures is impressive. You can just tell by how the supportive tones of gray bring a richness and depth to his work. I was looking at his facebook and website and found this great example I will keep in my mind to consider with process. I love the sketchy, washy colors as beginning layers. Like printers print from light to dark, I like seeing the darks applied before the lights and see how they are so helpful.

Playground in process by Marcus Dunn 2017
Playground, Marcus Dunn 2017 Acrylic on Canvas 80×80

Paint Chips in Bluffton

My process for painting is mostly from memory and sometimes photograph.  Last spring of 2018, I did a painting workshop for SOBA, Society of Bluffton Artists.  I brought in my low county landscapes to share the process of using paint chips and natural objects to inspire the palette for painting.  The age group was seniors with a decent amount of experience and willingness to break out of the need to ‘paint perfect’.  I very much could relate to this feeling and respected their willingness immensely.  Only one senior was pretty vocal about their distaste for ambiguous brushstrokes or expressive layers may not have the expected role of being a shadow or hightlight.

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